Baby, You're all that i want( Love Poem)

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Baby, You're all that i want

Red Rose for my baby

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Because she asked (Love Poem)

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"Sweet Love" poem

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truely madly deeply (Love Poem)

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truely madly deeply

Poems about love and missing someone...

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love poem

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Beautiful Love Poems

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Rhyming Love Poems- Your Love Make All Things Possible

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Rhyming Love Poems- Your Love Make All Things Possible

emotional love poems

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Romantic Love Poem

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Love Poem Of A Lifetime- Romantic!

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Love Poem

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Love Poem

I wanna be with you!!! Love poems

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You Are My Sunshine ( Love Poem)

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You Are My Sunshine ( Love Poem)

Light of love (Love poem)

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Light of Love (Love poem)

sad love poem with 3 days grace song

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Love Poems

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A video of collection of romantic Love Poems

Poems About Love

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Excellent Poems About Love.

Love Poem

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A Heart touching Love Poem

Cute Love Poems

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Love

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A very romantic presentation on Love

L.O.V.E

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Love

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The Poem- Love Poem

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Baby, You're all that i want-- Love Poem

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Baby, You're all that i want ( Love Poem)

I Love You Love Poem

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I love You Love Poem... A cute video

Love You Love Poem

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Love You Love Poem

Romantic Love Poems

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Romantic Love Poems

Cute Love Poems

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Cute Love Quote Video

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Love Poems

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Love Poems

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Love Poem Video

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Romantic Love Poems

Love Poem Video

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Beautiful Collection of Love Poems

♫♥Fausto Papetti - Ebb Tide♫♥ (Romantic/Relaxing Instrumental)♫♥

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Winslow Homer Paintings / Relaxing Piano Music

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Romantic Music

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Romantic Cello & Piano Music

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Romantic Instrumental(Guitar) by Aldo

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Hugging Pillow

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Here are some pictures showing girls hugging pillow in memories of their lovers and boyfriend,



A beautiful Asian girl hugging pillow, giving a very sexy feel to the image..


beautiful lady hugging pillow..





a cute girl hugging pillow and taling to the pillow..







ladies hugging pillows.







beautiful girl with cute eyes, hugging pillow..





again a very beautiful and cute girl hugging pillow , in very romantic mood.







asian lady hugging pillow and sleeping as if it is the lover..






a girl hugging pillow, with crazy eyes..

The reason for publishing the girls hugging pillows, is only that, pillows are best way to express love when you partner is not with you...it gives a feeling of missing you with lots of love..saying you are not away darling..so hug a pillow today if your love is distance away..







A Very Romantic Video

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A Very Romantic Song, excellent lyrics.. I Love you till the end

Romantic Video, Love Story Song

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A very Romantic song, love story

First Date Etiquette

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Dating For Teens: First Date Etiquette

How to Ask A Man for date

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Dating For Teens: How To Ask A Man On A Date

How to find Love by Internet Dating

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Find Love In A Month: How To Find Love By Internet Dating

A very Romantic Piano Instruemental (Love Story)

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myspace layouts

A very romantic instrumental which can increase your heartbeats, best to play at special occasions like date or propose.

Romantic Instrumentals (Piano)

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myspace layouts

Romantic Instrumentals

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myspace layouts

How to Flirt with a Man

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Get Flirting: How To Flirt With Men

How to get A GirlFriend if you are hopeless

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Getting A Date: How To Get A Girlfriend If You're A Hopeless Nerd

How To Make Yourself Into Boyfriend Material

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Dating Humor: Frienditis: How To Make Yourself Into Boyfriend Material

How to know you are in love

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THE LOVE STORY: How To Know You're In Love

How to Ask a Woman on Date

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Dating For Teens: How To Ask A Woman On A Date

How To Flirt with a Woman

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Getting A Date: How To Flirt With Women

How to Know if He is Interested

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Get Flirting: How Can I Tell If He Is Attracted To Me?

How to Kiss Creatively

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Get Flirting: How Can I Tell If She Is Attracted To Me?

How to know is she is interested , a nice video

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Get Flirting: How Can I Tell If She Is Attracted To Me?

How to kiss for the first time

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The Perfect Kiss: How To Kiss For The First Time

How to kiss for the first time

how to be a prefect boyfriend

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THE LOVE STORY: How To Be The Perfect Boyfriend

A Video on how to be a perfect boyfriend

How to be Perfect GirlFriend

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THE LOVE STORY: How To Be The Perfect Girlfriend


A Video on "How to be a Perfect Girl Friend

How to kiss Video

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THE LOVE STORY: How To Kiss Someone Passionately

Titanic Instrumental

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myspace layouts

A very romantic video to be played on the date..

How to be Romantic

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Getting Intimate: How To Be Romantic

A Video telling you how to be romantic

How to make a Girl Fall in Love with You

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The thought of learning how to make a girl fall in love with you is a disturbing one. Love is a huge emotion that can radically and completely dictate someone’s life.


If it was possible to perform a few magical steps in order to make someone fall in love with you, we would live in a harsh world of broken hearts. Uh oh… don’t we already?



You cannot make anyone do anything and you certainly cannot make anyone love you. The more you try to make someone love you, the less they will. Its kind of a catch-22 in that way but fortunately there are two aspects you can concentrate on to help you along the way.



What do you love in life? Usually its the things that make you happy and the things that we attribute the most value to. Keeping in mind these two aspects of human nature, we can therefore conclude that in order for someone to love us, we must make them happy and we must be valuable to them.



Let’s work on making them happy first, its really simple and is overlooked by most people. The simple rule to making someone happy is to be happy yourself. Being happy is contagious and people in your presence will automatically feel similar to you. If you’re happy about life, then the people around you will want to have you around them as well. If you’re always down, depressed or angry, then you are making yourself very hard to love.



Example #1: Think of someone that you love or loved. Imagine them in your mind until you can see a picture of their face. In this picture, are they happy or sad ? Its very likely that in the mental picture that you have, they are smiling or happy. If it worked for you, then it should also work for others.



The concept when pondering about how to make a girl fall in love with you is value. The things you love the most consequently have a lot of value. Can you really fall in love with something that has no value?


Things that are replaceable, or are easily attainable have little value in our lives. So make yourself valuable and people will love you. Being valuable isn’t as hard as people think.
The concept of value is relative, in an organization, the most valuable person is the boss even if in another situation, he could be completely insignificant. This is why so many secretaries are attracted to their boss. He has the most value. Let’s take this concept and apply it in practical situations.



Example #2, If you’re in school, then the most valuable person will be the person that is most respected by his peers. This can be the football star among cheerleaders, or the smart guy who gets the best grades. He can also be the guy who makes the girls laugh the most, or the guy that has the best house parties that everyone wants to attend.



In a work environment, the most valuable person can once again, be the social funny guy that everyone wants to hang out with, or the boss, or the sharp guy that the boss respects the most.
But… what if the girl I like doesn’t know about these social situations ? Well then… Tell her about your day! Although not as efficient, just telling her about your daily interactions (in a non-gloating way) can be an effective way of communicating your value.
The Double Your Dating book explains in detail exactly how to be perceived as the most valuable person while building massive attraction.
In the end, the concept of learning how to make a girl fall in love with you is a flawed one because as soon as you try to make someone love you, they won’t. So instead, concentrate on being happy and valuable, the rest will come naturally.

I Love You Greetings

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Send this eCard !

I Love You Greetings

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I Love You Greetings

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I Love You Greetings

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I Love You Greeting

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I Love you Greeting

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Love Calculator

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Myspace Love Calculator at WishAFriend.com

Best Love Caulculator

Historic Love Letter (Richard Steele)

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1707
Smith-streetWest-minster

Madam,
I lay down last night with your image in my thoughts, and have awak'd this morning in the same contemplation. The pleasing transport ith which I'me delighted, has a sweetnesse in it attended with a train of ten thousand soft desires, anxieties, and cares.The day arises on my hopes with new brightnesse; youth beauty and innocence are the charming objects that steal me from myself, and give me joys above the reach of ambition pride or glory. Believe me, Fair One, to throw myself at yr feet is giving myself the highest blisse I know of earth.Oh hasten ye minutes! Bring on the happy morning wherein to be ever her's will make me look down on Thrones!Dear Molly I am tenderly, passionately, faithfully thine,


Richard Steele

Sir Richard Steele, a Dublin-born English writer to Mary Scurlock in August, 1707. They were married shortly after the letter was written. He wrote her over 400 affectionate and often witty letters which she sold very profitably after his death.



Historical Love Letter (Lord Byron)

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November 16, 1814
My Heart -
We are thus far separated - but after all one mile is as bad as a thousand - which is a great consolation to one who must travel six hundred before he meets you again. If it will give you any satisfaction - I am as comfortless as a pilgrim with peas in his shoes - and as cold as Charity - Chastity or any other Virtue.


Lord Byron, English poet, to Annabella Milbanke, his future wife.



Historical Love Letter (Lord Byron)

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Lord Byron (1788 - 1824) was one of England's most notorious womanizers. A world-famous poet by the age of 24, he had a brief but extremely passionate affair with Lady Caroline Lamb. Pressured by Caroline's mother (who herself may have harbored affections for Byron), he used the opportunity to put an end to the relationship. In this letter, he explains his reasoning.

August 1812
My dearest Caroline,
If tears, which you saw & know I am not apt to shed, if the agitation in which I parted from you, agitation which you must have perceived through the whole of this most nervous nervous affair, did not commence till the moment of leaving you approached, if all that I have said & done, & am still but too ready to say & do, have not sufficiently proved what my real feelings are & must be ever towards you, my love, I have no other proof to offer.
God knows I wish you happy, & when I quit you, or rather when you from a sense of duty to your husband & mother quit me, you shall acknowledge the truth of what I again promise & vow, that no other in word or deed shall ever hold the place in my affection which is & shall be most sacred to you, till I am nothing.
I never knew till that moment, the madness of -- my dearest & most beloved friend -- I cannot express myself -- this is no time for words -- but I shall have a pride, a melancholy pleasure, in suffering what you yourself can hardly conceive -- for you don not know me. -- I am now about to go out with a heavy heart, because -- my appearing this Evening will stop any absurd story which the events of today might give rise to -- do you think now that I am cold & stern, & artful -- will even others think so, will your mother even -- that mother to whom we must indeed sacrifice much, more much more on my part, than she shall ever know or can imagine.
"Promises not to love you" ah Caroline it is past promising -- but shall attribute all concessions to the proper motive -- & never cease to feel all that you have already witnessed -- & more than can ever be known but to my own heart -- perhaps to yours -- May God protect forgive & bless you -- ever & even more than ever.
yr. most attached
BYRON
P.S. -- These taunts which have driven you to this -- my dearest Caroline -- were it not for your mother & the kindness of all your connections, is there anything on earth or heaven would have made me so happy as to have made you mine long ago? & not less now than then, but more than ever at this time -- you know I would with pleasure give up all here & all beyond the grave for you -- & in refraining from this -- must my motives be misunderstood --? I care not who knows this -- what use is made of it -- it is you & to you only that they owe yourself, I was and am yours, freely & most entirely, to obey, to honour, love --& fly with you when, where, & how you yourself might & may determine.






Historical Love Letter (Robert Burdette)

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April 25, 1898
And when I have reasoned it all out, and set metes and bounds for your love that it may not pass, lo, a letter from Clara, and in one sweet, ardent, pure, Edenic page, her love overrides my boudaries as the sea sweeps over rocks and sands alike, crushes my barriers into dust out of which they were builded, over whelms me with its beauty, bewilders me with its sweetness, charms me with its purity, and loses me in its great shoreless immensity.


Robert Burdette, minister, to Clara Baker. They were married the following year



Historical Love Letter (Elizabeth Moulton Barret)

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Elizabeth Moulton Barrett (1806-61) poet, was born near Durham, England, eldest of a family of 12 children, and grew up in the countryside. In 1838 the Barretts moved to 50 Wimpole Street, London. By the time Robert Browning began to correspond with her in 1845, she was an established poet. Four years after their runaway marriage, she wrote her most famous love poems, Sonnets from the Portuguese.
The couple settled in Florence, where their son, Robert Wiedemann Barrett (known as Pen for short), was born in 1849. Elizabeth was then 43. She had a huge popular success with Aurora Leigh (1857), a love story in verse. Her always delicate health gradually became worse; she died on June 29, 1861, and is buried in Florence.
Robert Browning (1812-89) a great Victorian poet, was born in London, the son of a clerk in the Bank of England, and educated by his father, who paid for the printing of his first poems. His early works, mostly verse plays, were little read and less understood. Men and Women (1855), his first collection of dramatic lyrics, sold few copies and the disappointed Browning abandoned writing to care for his adored wife. After her death he turn again to poetry; Dramatis Personae (1864) was a success and was followed by his greatest work, The Ring and the Book (1868-69), which established him as a literary giant, although his many succeeding books never sold as well as Elizabeth's. He died in Venice in the winter of 1889 and is buried in Westminster Abbey.
January 10, 1846
Do you know, when you have told me to think of you, I have been feeling ashamed of thinking of you so much, of thinking of only you--which is too much, perhaps. Shall I tell you? It seems to me, to myself, that no man was ever before to any woman what you are to me--the fulness must be in proportion, you know, to the vacancy...and only I know what was behind--the long wilderness without the blossoming rose...and the capacity for happiness, like a black gaping hole, before this silver flooding. Is it wonderful that I should stand as in a dream, and disbelieve--not you--but my own fate?
Was ever any one taken suddenly from a lampless dungeon and placed upon the pinnacle of a mountain, without the head turning round and the heart turning faint, as mine do? And you love me more, you say?--Shall I thank you or God? Both,--indeed--and there is no possible return from me to either of you! I thank you as the unworthy may.. and as we all thank God. How shall I ever prove what my heart is to you? How will you ever see it as I feel it? I ask myself in vain. Have so much faith in me, my only beloved, as to use me simply for your own advantage and happiness, and to your own ends without a thought of any others--that is all I could ask you without any disquiet as to the granting of it--May God bless you! -- Your B.A



Historical Love Letter(Juliette)

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Friday 8 p.m.
If only I were a clever woman, I could describe to you my gorgeous bird, how you unite in yourself the beauties of form, plumage, and song!
I would tell you that you are the greatest marvel of all ages, and I should only be speaking the simple truth. But to put all this into suitable words, my superb one, I should require a voice far more harmonious than that which is bestowed upon my species - for I am the humble owl that you mocked at only lately, therefore, it cannot be.
I will not tell you to what degree you are dazzling and to the birds of sweet song who, as you know, are none the less beautiful and appreciative.
I am content to delegate to them the duty of watching, listening and admiring, while to myself I reserve the right of loving; this may be less attractive to the ear, but it is sweeter far to the heart.
I love you, I love you. my Victor; I can not reiterate it too often; I can never express it as much as I feel it.
I recognise you in all the beauty that surrounds me in form, in colour, in perfume, in harmonious sound: all of these mean you to me. You are superior to all. I see and admire - you are all!
You are not only the solar spectrum with the seven luminous colours, but the sun himself, that illumines, warms, and revivifies! This is what you are, and I am the lowly woman that adores you.
Juliette
Juliette Drouet, French actress, to Victor Hugo, French writer, some time in 1835. She wrote passionate and lyrical love letters to Hugo for over 50 years.



Historical Love Letter(Robert Browning)

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To Elizabeth Barrett Browning:
...would I, if I could, supplant one of any of the affections that I know to have taken root in you - that great and solemn one, for instance. I feel that if I could get myself remade, as if turned to gold, I WOULD not even then desire to become more than the mere setting to that diamond you must always wear.
The regard and esteem you now give me, in this letter, and which I press to my heart and bow my head upon, is all I can take and all too embarrassing, using all my gratitude.
- Robert Browning
(1812-1889)



Historical Love Letter(Elizabeth Barret Browning)

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To Robert Browning:
And now listen to me in turn. You have touched me more profoundly than I thought even you could have touched me - my heart was full when you came here today. Henceforward I am yours for everything....


- Elizabeth Barrett Browning
(1806-1861)





Historical Love Letter (Oliver Cromwell)

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Oliver Cromwell (1599 - 1658) was the leader of the famous English rebellion which deposed and executed King Charles I in 1649. He united the kingdoms of England, Scotland and Wales, ruling as chairman of the Commonwealth until his death. Through all this upheaval, he remained quite affectionate with his wife, whom he had married when he was 21.Dunbar, 4 September, 1650For my beloved Wife Elizabeth Cromwell, at the Cockpit:My Dearest,I have not leisure to write much, but I could chide thee that in many of thy letters thou writest to me, that I should not be unmindful of thee and thy little ones. Truly, if I love thee not too well, I think I err not on the other hand much. Thou art dearer to me than any creature; let that suffice.The Lord hath showed us an exceeding mercy: who can tell how great it is. My weak faith hath been upheld. I have been in my inward man marvellously supported; though I assure thee, I grow an old man, and feel infirmities of age marvellously stealing upon me. Would my corruptions did as fast decrease. Pray on my behalf in the latter respect. The particulars of our late success Harry Vane or Gil. Pickering will impart to thee. My love to all dear friends. I rest thine,Oliver Cromwell



Historical Love Letters(Duff Cooper)

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June 9, 1914
Don't write too legibly or intelligibly as I have no occupation so pleasant as pondering for hours over your hieroglyphics, and for hours more trying to interpret your dark sayings. A clearly written simply expressed letter is too like the lightening.


Duff Cooper, English politician, to Diana, to whom he married five years later.



Historical Love Letters (John Constable)

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John Constable (1776-1837) came to dominate English landscape painting in the late 19th century. At the time of his death he was relatively unknown, but admiration for the freshness of his English landscapes soared during the Victorian period. He was born in East Bergholt, Suffolk, a village that he made famous through his scenes of local rural life, and he remained passionately fond of the Suffolk countryside throughout his career. As a young man Constable learned about the practicalities of farming from his father, but showed an enthusiasm for painting, and a marked reluctance to follow in his father's trade. He worked constantly at improving his sketching, and in his mid-20's began to develop his own realistic style. He showed the same sense of purpose in his courtship of Maria Bicknell, whom he married against the wishes of her family. In the years following their marriage he produced his best work, often of Suffolk scenes, including Stratford Mill (1820), The Hay-wain (1821), and View on the Stour near Dedham (1822). As Maria's health failed he painted more somber views with stormy skies--Hadleigh Castle (1829) and Salisbury Cathedral from the Meadows (1831).
East Bergholt. February 27, 1816
I received your letter my ever dearest Maria, this morning. You know my anxious disposition too well not be aware how much I feel at this time. At the distance we are from each other every fear will obtrude itself on my mind. Let me hope that you are not really worse than your kindness, your affection, for me make you say...I think...that no more molestation will arise to the recovery of your health, which I pray for beyond every other blessing under heaven.
Let us...think only of the blessings that providence may yet have in store for us and that we may yet possess. I am happy in love--an affection exceeding a thousand times my deserts, which has continued so many years, and is yet undiminished...Never will I marry in this world if I marry not you. Truly can I say that for the seven years since I avowed my love for you, I have...foregone all company, and the society of all females (except my own relations) for your sake.
I am still ready to make my sacrifice for you...I will submit to any thing you may command me--but cease to respect, to love and adore you I never can or will. I must still think that we should have married long ago--we should have had many troubles--but we have yet had no joys, and we could not have starved...Your FRIENDS have never been without a hope of parting us and see what that has cost us both--but no more. Believe me, my beloved & ever dearest Maria, most faithfully yours, John



Historical Love Letter (Mark Twain)

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May 12, 1869
Out of the depths of my happy heart wells a great tide of love and prayer for this priceless treasure that is confided to my life-long keeping.
You cannot see its intangible waves as they flow towards you, darling, but in these lines you will hear, as it were, the distant beating of the surf.
Mark Twain (Samuel Langhorne Clemens), American writer, to Olivia Langdon, his future wife.






Historical Love Letter(Jane Clairmont to Lord Byron)

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You bid me write short to you and I have much to say. You also bade me believe that it was a fancy which made me cherish an attachment for you. It cannot be a fancy since you have been for the last year the object upon which every solitary moment led me to muse.
I do not expect you to love me, I am not worthy of your love. I feel you are superior, yet much to my surprise, more to my happiness, you betrayed passions I had believed no longer alive in your bosom. Shall I also have to ruefully experience the want of happiness? Shall I reject it when it is offered? I may appear to you imprudent, vicious; my opinions detestable, my theory depraved; but one thing, at least, time shall show you: that I love gently and with affection, that I am incapable of anything approaching to the feeling of revenge or malice; I do assure you, your future will shall be mine, and everything you shall do or say, I shall not question.
Jane Clairmont to Lord Byron -- 1815





Historical Love Letters(Winston Churchil)

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January 23, 1935
My darling Clemmie,
In your letter from Madras you wrote some words very dear to me, about my having enriched your life. I cannot tell you what pleasure this gave me, because I always feel so overwhelmingly in your debt, if there can be accounts in love.... What it has been to me to live all these years in your heart and companionship no phrases can convey.
Time passes swiftly, but is it not joyous to see how great and growing is the treasure we have gathered together, amid the storms and stresses of so many eventful and to millions tragic and terrible
years?
Your loving husband
(Winston Churchill)



Historical Love letters (Randolf S. Churchill)

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Lord Randolph (Henry Spencer) Churchill (1849-95), the third son of the seventh duke of Marlborough, first entered the House of Commons in 1874--the same year he married Jennie--when he was just 25 years old. From 1876 to 1880 he was unofficial private secretary to his father, lord lieutenant (viceroy) of Ireland, actively supporting local self-government (but not Home Rule) for Ireland. In 1885 he was appointed secretary of state for India, and in 1886 chancellor of the exchequer and leader of the House of Commons. In December of that year, his resignation (a political ploy to push through his budget) was unexpectedly accepted. Illness in his last years resulted in a painful death at age 45. His son, Winston, later became Prime Minister of Great Britain.

August 1873

I cannot keep myself from writing any longer to you dearest, although I have not had any answer to either of my two letters. I suppose your mother does not allow you to write to me. Perhaps you have not got either of my letters...I am so dreadfully afraid that perhaps you may think I am forgetting you.

I can assure you dearest Jeannette you have not been out of my thoughts hardly for one minute since I left you Monday. I have written to my father everything, how much I love you how much I long & pray & how much I wld sacrifice if it were necessary to be married to you and to live ever after with you.

I shall [not] get an answer till Monday & whichever way it lies I shall go to Cowes soon after & tell your mother everything. I am afraid she does not like me vy much from what I have heard...I wld do anything she wished if she only wld not oppose us. Dearest if you are as fond of me as I am of you...nothing human cld keep us long apart.

This last week has seemed an eternity to me; Oh, I wld give my soul for another of those days we had together not long ago...Oh if I cld only get one line from you to reassure me, but I dare not ask you to do anything that your mother wld disapprove of or has perhaps forbidden you to do... Sometimes I doubt so I cannot help it whether you really like me as you said at Cowes you did. If you do I cannot fear for the future tho' difficulties may lie in our way only to be surmounted by patience.

Goodbye dearest Jeannette. My first and only love...Believe me ever to be Yrs devotedly and lovingly,

Randolf S. Churchill



Historical Love Letter( The Queen Of England)

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The Queen of England and mother to Queen Mary, Catherine of Aragon (1485 - 1536) is best known as the first of the many wives of Henry VIII. Though he divorced her in 1533, Catherine remained devoted to Henry until her death in 1536, as this letter shows.

1535
My Lord and Dear Husband,
I commend me unto you. The hour of my death draweth fast on, and my case being such, the tender love I owe you forceth me, with a few words, to put you in remembrance of the health and safeguard of your soul, which you ought to prefer before all worldly matters, and before the care and tendering of your own body, for the which you have cast me into many miseries and yourself into many cares.
For my part I do pardon you all, yea, I do wish and devoutly pray God that He will also pardon you.
For the rest I commend unto you Mary, our daughter, beseeching you to be a good father unto her, as I heretofore desired. I entreat you also, on behalf of my maids, to give them marriage-portions, which is not much, they being but three. For all my other servants, I solicit a year's pay more than their due, lest they should be unprovided for.
Lastly, do I vow, that mine eyes desire you above all things.



Historical Love Letters( Lewis Carrol)

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Christ Church, Oxford, October 28, 1876
My Dearest Gertrude:
You will be sorry, and surprised, and puzzled, to hear what a queer illness I have had ever since you went. I sent for the doctor, and said, "Give me some medicine. for I'm tired." He said, "Nonsense and stuff! You don't want medicine: go to bed!"
I said, "No; it isn't the sort of tiredness that wants bed. I'm tired in the face." He looked a little grave, and said, "Oh, it's your nose that's tired: a person often talks too much when he thinks he knows a
great deal." I said, "No, it isn't the nose. Perhaps it's the hair." Then he looked rather grave, and said, "Now I understand: you've been playing too many hairs on the pianoforte."
"No, indeed I haven't!" I said, "and it isn't exactly the hair: it's more about the nose and chin." Then he looked a good deal graver, and said, "Have you been walking much on your chin lately?" I said, "No." "Well!" he said, "it puzzles me very much.
Do you think it's in the lips?" "Of course!" I said. "That's exactly what it is!"
Then he looked very grave indeed, and said, "I think you must have been giving too many kisses." "Well," I said, "I did give one kiss to a baby child, a little friend of mine."
"Think again," he said; "are you sure it was only one?" I thought again, and said, "Perhaps it was eleven times." Then the doctor said, "You must not give her any more till your lips are quite rested
again." "But what am I to do?" I said, "because you see, I owe her a hundred and eighty-two more." Then he looked so grave that tears ran down his cheeks, and he said, "You may send them to her in a box."
Then I remembered a little box that I once bought at Dover, and thought I would someday give it to some little girl or other. So I have packed them all in it very carefully. Tell me if they come safe or if any are lost on the way."
Lewis Carroll



Historical Love Letters (Stella)

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18th November 1912
33 Kensington Square

No more shams -- a real love letter this time -- then I can breathe freely, and perhaps who knows begin to sit up and get well --
I haven't said 'kiss me' because life is too short for the kiss my heart calls for... All your words are as idle wind -- Look into my eyes for two minutes without speaking if you dare! Where would be
your 54 years? and my grandmother's heart? and how many hours would you be late for dinner?
-- If you give me one kiss and you can only kiss me if I say 'kiss me' and I will never say 'kiss me' because I am a respectable widow and I wouldn't let any man kiss me unless I was sure of the wedding ring --
Stella
(Liza, I mean).
George Bernard Shaw, an Irish dramatist, and 'Stella' (Beatrice Campbell, English actress), corresponded for 40 years





Historic Love Letter(George Gordon)

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George Gordon, Lord Byron (1788-1824)
English Romantic poet and satirist, Byron was brought up in poverty in Scotland. At the age of 10 he inherited his great-uncle's title and property, and moved to Newstead Abbey, England. Byron was educated at Harrow and later Cambridge. Travels in Greece resulted in the sardonic poem Childe Harold's Pilgrimage. In January 1815 he married Annabella Milbanke, who bore him a daughter, Augusta, and then left him. During 1818-23, years spent with Teresa Guiccioli, he wrote three cantos of Don Juan, a satirical romance, the Prophecy of Dante, and four poetic dramas. Longing to help Greece obtain independence from Turkey, he joined their fight in December 1823, but died of fever on April 19, 1824. Refused burial in Westminster Abbey, he is buried with his ancestors near Newstead Abbey. Bologna,
25 August, 1819
My dearest Teresa,
I have read this book in your garden;--my love, you were absent, or else I could not have read it. It is a favourite book of yours, and the writer was a friend of mine. You will not understand these English words, and others will not understand them,--which is the reason I have not scrawled them in Italian. But you will recognize the handwriting of him who passionately loved you, and you will divine that, over a book which was yours, he could only think of love.
In that word, beautiful in all languages, but most so in yours--Amor mio--is comprised my existence here and hereafter. I feel I exist here, and I feel I shall exist hereafter,--to what purpose you will decide; my destiny rests with you, and you are a woman, eighteen years of age, and two out of a convent. I love you, and you love me,--at least, you say so, and act as if you did so, which last is a great consolation in all events.
But I more than love you, and cannot cease to love you. Think of me, sometimes, when the Alps and ocean divide us, --but they never will, unless you wish it.